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forces have been bearing down on al qaeda and the taliban in pakistan and afghanistan. osama bin laden has been killed and al qaeda is significantly weakened. in afghanistan british and international forces have driven al qaeda from its bases and while it is too early to tell for certain initial evidence suggests we halted the momentum of the taliban insurgency in its heartland. mr. speaker, we are entering a new phase in which the afghan forces will do more of the fighting and patrolling and our forces training and mentoring. as president obama said last month the mission is changing from, that to support. when we arrived there was no one to hand over to. no proper army or police. in many places across the country the afghan security forces now stand ready to begin the process of taking over security responsibility. success in afghanistan requires a number of critical steps. the first is making sure the afghan security forces are able to secure their own territory. there have been well known problems especially with the afghan police but there has been real progress in the last two ye
led political entitlement. the death of bin laden presents the taliban with a moment of choice. al qaeda are weakened. their leader is dead. last month the u n adopted two separate sanctions regimes creating a clear distinction to separate taliban from al qaeda. local peace councils havbeen established in almost all afghanistan's provinces allow 1800 people from 17 provinces to be enrolled for reintegration. we should take this opportunity to send a clear message to the taliban that now is the time to break al qaeda and participate in a peaceful political process. in this task we need pakistan's assistance. as i discussed last week as much in pakistan's interest as britain or afghanistan. the taliban pose a more wolf read to the states of pakistan as well. mr. speaker there is no reason afghanistan should be destined to remain a broken country. it has fertile agricultural land and stands at the crossroads of asia's training program. it has succeeded in the past when not wracked by conflict. afghanistan has many challenges ahead. there are security issues and lack of government capa
. >> al qaeda is under more pressure than at any time since 9/11. >> reporter: still this deadly taliban raid on a hotel in kabul last week shows insurgents aren't willing to go quietly. >> if we don't succeed here and the taliban comes back into power we'll be attacked again. >> reporter: while the debate continues, american troops are carrying on with their mission preparing to hand over security back to the afghan people, the drawdown is set to begin this month. terrell, some initial diplomatic moves have been made to jumpstart peace talks with the taliban but on his trip senator mccain saw no signs whatsoever the taliban is ready to talk peace. >> joel brown in washington for thus morning, thank you so much. >>> overseas, thailand elected its first ever female prime minister by a landslide, comes from a political family, her brother was once prime minister but ousted by a military coup in 2006. the country will go along with the election results. >>> peace activists plan to sail from greece today even though the greek government banned their ships from going to gaza. protests yesterd
in a helicopter crash after a firefight with taliban drug traffickers that also claimed the lives of seven serviceman. on october29th, 2009, the remains of dea special agents forest lehman, chad michael, michael westin, and the fallen united states service members were met by president obama at dover air force base. he honored the men and paid his respects at the dignified transfer ceremony. co-chairman grassley and i wish to convene our deepest condolences to the families of these dea agents that gave their lives fighting narcotics trafficking in afghanistan and hereby enter their obituaries into the record for today's hearing. its hard i think for both of us to realize that we have people who carry out these missions and get killed carrying out these missions, and they do our country great service, and not much is said about it. but this committee wants everyone to know that we very much appreciate that service and we certainly honor it in the best way we can. so i would now like to turn to my co-chairman, senator grassley, for his opening statement. >> thank you for honoring the memory
released by taliban showing 16 men being executed. >> this is a graphic look at how brutal and ugly the war against the taliban can get. some of you may find this very disturbing. if you would like to turn away, this is a good time to do so. let's walk you through this video. it was released by the taliban, posted online. men wearing traditional pakistani garb, all of them with their hands tied behind their back. in front of them, you see three armed men, you assume these are taliban fighters. one of them is scolding the men who are lined up, accusing them of being enemies of islam, saying these executions are about to take place for six children. the military here vehemently denies those excuses took place. after the scolding is over, that's when you see and hear the gunfire. you see the men topple to the ground, some of them moaning and writhing in pain. we're not going so show you what happened next. some of the gunmen walk up to the men and shoot them again, sometimes in an effort too make sure they're dead. the military believes the men who were killed were police officers kidnapped du
. >> i want to bring in david who is following the wave of assassinations. the taliban is claiming responsibility for the mayor's murder. what is being said about this? >> reporter: well, ambassador crocker who is on his third day here in afghanistan is said to proceed with caution. he intends to take credit for high profile attacks, and whether or not they are behind it is unclear. two young girls had been inadvertently killed in a road accident. and officials asked if it was a revenge killing by the girls' family members or a taliban attack. crocker said if it was a taliban attack he said it operates a sign of operational weakness. >> i think because of the success of the coalition campaign in the south, including in kandahar, we are seeing a phenomenon that is not dissimilar to what we saw in iraq. i would judge that the taliban is now damaged to the point where they can no longer conduct large-scale operations. they have had to kind of regroup and figure out what they can do, and in some cases, that has been assassination. again, we saw a very similar pattern in iraq. >> now, c
are there to battle taliban coming in from afghanistan. >> reporter: kunar in eastern afghanistan is some of the toughest terrain america has troops in here. you can see this particular base is surrounded by hills on either side, which give the insurgency a central vantage point from which they can attack. the base violence is so consistent it makes it very hard for them to have the kind of contact with locals they need. life here really a waiting game for the worst to happen. everywhere you look, here in kunar on afghanistan's eastern border, the choices aren't good. outpost king is caught between hills full of taliban. if the americans leave, militants from pakistan will flow through the valley. if they stay, every few days this happens. the mortars hit the base. the last attack was long enough ago there's panic, they're worried the taliban have been preparing a big one. after days of nothing, the insurgents are finally beginning an attack from all sides. >> fire. >> command hustle up, grab it and get ready. >> reporter: they use mortars first, aiming for taliban dark into the hills but
and afghan security forces are conducting joint operations against the taliban. thursday the troops used helicopters to fly in search of taliban fighters. the current plan is for afghan forces to take over the country's security by 2014. >>> two people were killed when their plane crashed into an unoccupied hospital building in watsonville, california. the plane struck the building shortly after takeoff apparently as the pilot was trying to clear a line of fog. >>> economists look for positive unemployment numbers being released today. >>> plus it's raining? no, not quite, it's pouring in denver, a sudden cloud burst swamps the mile high city. first, scott pelley has a preview of tonight's "cbs evening news." >> from nasa's first mission to now the final shuttle flight, we'll look at how cbs news and walter cronkite covered the space race for the last 50 years, that story tonight on the "cbs evening news." we all have internal plumbing. but for some of us with overactive bladder, our pipes just don't work as well as they should. sometimes, i worry my pipes might leak. but i learned there
the taliban's recent offensive. the move raises concerns about the future of security in the country. canadian troops held a ceremony on thursday to formally hand over their field operations to u.s. forces. the withdrawal ends a mission as part of the nato-led force. canada has kept about 3,000 combat troops in afghanistan for more than five years. some 950 will remain until 2014 to help train afghan security forces. >> i'm extremely proud of my soldiers. our soldiers have, again, accomplished a great deal here in afghanistan. >> with the united states about to begin gradually withdrawing troops, allied nations including france and britain, have also announced plans to reduce their own military presence. meanwhile, local anger at international forces is on the rise. villagers in the eastern province of host took to the streets to protest a nato raid they claim killed is 1 locals this week. the increasing number of civilian casualties is believed to be one way the taliban tries to broaden supports. insurgents targeted locations that were previously considereded secure. last month's raid on a he
, taliban and others got strength and found terrorist center and now we're involved in a war that involves the future of the world, not just peace for the world, but american peace as well. indeed, i would be very caution as we go about -- cautious as we go about suggesting that we automatically walk away from the commander in chief's plan. indeed if we are not careful, the vacuum will catch up with us and america will find itself in a much broader and a much more intense struggle. with that i yield back the balance of my time. >> would the gentleman yield? the chair: the gentleman yields back? for what purpose does the gentleman from tennessee rise? >> i move to strike the last word. the chair: the gentleman is recognized for five minutes. mr. cohen: thank you. before i yield to my colleague from california to respond, i would like to mention, i appreciated mr. lewis' history, but i would suggest to you that al qaeda could have found a base in yemen, they could have found a base in the sudan, they could have found a base in other places. there was nothing particularly unique about afghani
action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, secretary panetta told reporters on the plane it's time to focus on defeating al qaeda once and for all. >> i think we had undermined their ablthd to conduct 9/11-type attacks. we had them on the run. >> secretary panetta met with american military officials. atia abawi is in afghanistan. good morning. bring us up to date. >> good morning. panetta's very first trip as secretary of defense to afghanistan, before he landed he brought up the situation with al qaeda. he said, quote, the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach. this is a time to go after him, especially after bin laden. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden, to put maximum pressure on them because i do believe that, if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> panetta said that, in fact, in that information they found from bin laden's compound it points to 10 to 20 key leaders of al qaeda in different places such as pakistan, yemen, somalia and different parts of africa. but coming b
planned. u.s. officials say they killed 120 insurgents. many taliban, but several of them arabs linked to al qaeda damaging their network. the clashes reveal that al qaeda for years, said to be mostly across the border in pakistan is a concern back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we pushed down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high-tech american attack helicopters buzzed overhead until militants shot at them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban i know. they're getting gutsy. right past there. if you go past that you're going to take enemy contact, it's pretty certain. >> the afghans are clear about who lay in weight for them ahead. >> translator: it's very dangerous, there are taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of the valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading. nick payton walsh, cnn a
in addition of karzai's brother's assassination, it is still the same thing. >>shepard: the taliban are still, in large part, with their judicial system on wheels, and still have much in control in many places? >>guest: yes, but the taliban is shifting. they are trying to get back into power but, at the same time, the north has form add new political alliance that will never let the taliban rule so we are headed for a divisive period in politics over the next two or three years. >>shepard: what is your sense as this wraps up, what might have been accomplished? >>guest: we have shifted afghanistan toward america's values and ideas and when you go to kabul or kandahar and walk around people feel like they are part of the world and no longer buried in a draconian regime. we have done an amazing amount of good work with the infrastructure projects. but we took that country from zero to 60 in 10 years so you will see a lot, a lot, a lot of fighting and infighting, as well, much like when the russians left. people will make grabs for power in the power vacuum. so both good and bad. >>shepard: we're
once again become a haven for al-qaeda should the taliban ever return to power there. that is according to the top u.s. commander in afghanistan general david petraeus. as you may know, later this month general petraeus will be stepping down from his role to head the cia and in an interview with fox the general said the military has had a lot of success eradicating militants but cautioned that the job is not over. >> that task has been accomplished but, of course, it is threatened because, of course, the taliban allowed al-qaeda on afghan soil when it ran the country and we believe that there is a high likelihood that that would happen again. >> the general has also said that the military focus will soon shift from taliban strongholds to the boarder with pakistan. >>> capture or kill. that reportedly is the question the obama administration is internally debating when it comes to what to do about wanted terrorists. we all know capturing suspects in the mountains of pakistan or in yemen is not easy and if the recent uptick in predator drone strikes is any indication it appears the white
's speculation of everybody from the cia to drug lords to the taliban. >> absolutely. that speculation is still runs. it's not clear whether his absence will have that big of a stabilizing effect. from the united states point of view karzai's brother caused a lot of problems, he was always playing a double game, but he managed a lot of relationships. he had the charisma to maintain that network. for karzai. that was crucial. you can see how karzai really needed a counterbalance to the taliban when it came to now we have to see who can fill that void try to manage those relationship nots to mention the lucrative narcotics routes to try to maintain the piece while u.s. forces are there. more importantly, though, the real focus we have is the u.s./pakistani negotiation and whether pakistan can come through in developing some sort of accommodate with the taliban that would allow the u.s. to disengage. >> dave, go ahead. >> what is the impact of the united states drawing down in afghanistan? i'm talking about police actions and espionage, which we can pursue anyway. what is the impact of us drawing
/11. >> reporter: this deadly taliban raid shows insurgents aren't willing to go quietly. >> if we don't succeed here and the taliban comes back into power, we'll be attacked again. >> reporter: while the debate continues, american troops are carrying on with their mission preparing to hand over security back to the afghan people. the draw down is set to begin this month. joel brown, cbs news, washington. >>> 4:50 now. the families of two uc berkeley garage walts still being held in iran are taking part in a hunger strike now. shane and josh have been held on spying charges for nearly two years now. sara shourd who was arrested with them was released last fall. now they went on a hunger strike to be protest for letters being cut off from the families. family members launched their own strike to show solidarity. >>> damage from an oil spill at yellowstone river. a pipeline ruptured on friday spewing about 42,000 gallons of crude into the famous waterway. the damage is limited but montana's governor says it's silly to make such a claim so early in the television. environmental protection agency sa
murdoch's newscorp operation. this one is interesting. the taliban claims it was a victim. the group accusing the u.s. of hacking in to its cell phones to send false text messages saying that its leader, mullah omar was dead. we're following the story. we go live to kabul, afghanistan. david, this one has got people wondering. what's going on? >> reporter: well, the news first broke by an afghan television station and then later in the day, cnn and other media received a message by an individual claiming to be a top taliban commander. that individual said that mullah omar had died of heart failure last week and a successor had already been named. the taliban, like you said, later came out and said they have been the victim of a hacking and their phones and emails have been tapped. in fact this message was phoney. cnn doesn't have any confirmation of the sort. we spoke with nato official and they have no operational knowledge on the ground. so the whereabouts of mullah omar are unknown. last believed to be in pakistan, where taliban militants have launched attacks across that border a
rough. the coalition troops and the taliban moved on foot. the coalition also has helicopters that can get them between mountain tops. they would be back to walking around on foot. these are law that useful. -- a lot less useful. they are used for blowing up vehicles. in some places, you see more small arms. this sort of looks like a world war ii street battle on a smaller scale. guys running around with rifles and tossing grenades, things like that. on the coalition side, there is a significant air power aspect of it as well. the tactical security threats to nato troops. >> this is located in the far most peace which is a ride along the border. this is a critical area for cross border infiltration as well as a historic avenue and the movement of supplies. >> in terms of the risk to u.s. troops, how would you characterize this? >> i would characterize this as high as venture. there is a significant influx of insurgent fighters to the area. >> we are prepared to go on a mission, tell me about that and what it is for. >> this is a standard reconnaissance mission. we're going in there to
in southern afghanistan. that region, of course, the birthplace of the taliban movement and the site of continued violence from insurgency. ahmed walid karzai was a pivotal figure in talks with the taliban. according to many annual polices his reported ties to heroin and opium dealers and allegations weighs on the cia payroll made him a serious liability. "the fox report's" chief correspondent jonathan hunt on the top story from the bottom of the hour from new york. it's kind of good news and bad news if a death can be good news. >> in a sense bad news because it produces some instability in a country like afghanistan. that is never good particularly in southern afghanistan where walid karzai was particularly powerful but where the taliban might try to fill the power vacuum created by his death. it also though according some analysts because wari karzai was entirely corrupt and he was tied in that corruption to the united states. so, annual listings like michael o'hanlon of the brookings institution believe it's a chance for the u.s. to create a clean slate. listen. >> it does potent
, millions of dollars every day may be winding up in the taliban hands. there is breaking news now on fox news channel. you are looking live and lo and behold the football season may be saved. they are setting up for a news conference right now. the nfl commissioner roger goodell on what may be a new collective bargaining agreement. we will have live coverage. the nfl, please say it's true. hi. you know, i can save you 15% today if you open up a charge card account with us. [ male announcer ] identity thieves never stop coming up with ways to steal from you. they can open up an account in your nam and go on a serious spending spree. do you have cufflinks? mm-hmm. gold ones? [ male announcer ] not on our watch. we're lifelock. go to lifelock.com and learn how our patented billion point database can help protecyou. call 1-800-lifelock today. lifelock. relentlessly protecting your identity. i don't know. the usual? [ blower whirring ] sometimes it pays to switch things up. my - what, my hair? no. car insurance. i switched to progressive and they gave me discounts for the time i spent with my
of aid to pakistan's army. the u.s. wants more aggressive actions taken against the taliban and isn't happy about the country's decision to revoke visas for american military trainers, this according to reports at the new york times. mr. daley stopped by abc this week to talk about the tricky relationship. >> obviously they have been an important ally in the fight in terrorism. they've been the victim of enormous amounts of terrorism, but right now they have taken some steps that have given us reason to pause on some of the aid which we were giving to their military and we're trying to work through that. >> tensions between the two countries have been on the rise since u.s. navy seals killed osama bin laden bin during a raid on -- osama bin laden during a raid on pakistani soil in may. >>> defense secretary leon panetta says he believes allied forces can beat back al-qaeda and the taliban. fox's david piper reports from a visit of american troops in afghanistan this weekend. >> reporter: before leaving to iraq america's defense secretary headed to afghanistan to see for himself the
's gone too far. >> paul thank you for joining us. appreciate your time. >> thank you. >>> the taliban is getting in on the phone hacking thing. the afghan group insists its phones and website were hacked and that's what caused the announcement that its leader had died. the taliban now insists its chief is alive. denies that he died of a heart attack in spite of the text message and web announcement that went out. the taliban blames u.s. intelligence agencies for the hack. >>> a stark warning from the capitol. we're in the debt deadline danger zone. time is running out to get a deal done. just 13 days left. and now there are three debt proposals being debated on capitol hill. none of them with any kind of consensus. yesterday the republican-led house passed cut, cap and balance. the tea party backed plan calls for deep spending cuts, a balanced cap and balanced budget amendment. republicans cheered the plan, democrats say it's a nonstarter. >> it's time for republicans in the house and the senate to end the political shenanigans to drop their doa plan to cap, cut and kill medicare and
making against the taliban as well as al qaeda. as well as $800 million in assistance could be suspended. this could cause some major problems. if pakistan takes tougher action, the aid could resume. mean while, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan. panetta is meeting with american military leaders and afghan officials. nbc's atia abawi is in kabul this morning. bring us up to speed on what leon panetta is saying that al qaeda is basically on the run and close to being completely stamped out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. the new secretary of defense's first trip as the defense secretary here in afghanistan, prior to arriving he talked to reporters on the plane about how he feels alg al qaeda is going right now, the war against terror. he says the strategic defeat of al qaeda is within reach, primarily pointing the the death of bin laden, the information they got from the compound including names of different key al qaeda leaders. he says this is the time to actually end the war with al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happen
killed one of his close advisers, as well as a member of parliament. the taliban is claiming responsibility. it comes less than a week after the assassination of karzai's half-brother. >>> some terrifying moments in canada, when a sudden and violent storm caused the main stage in ottawa blues festival to collapse. the performing band, cheap trick, managed to escape unharmed, but at least five stage volunteers were hurt, one seriously. >>> and, first it was mila kunis, then justin timberlake. now 90-year-old actress betty white has been invited to the marine corp ball. in a youtube video, sergeant ray lewis called the legendary golden girl funny, sweet and mature, the all-around perfect woman. and now here's an early look at how wall street will kick off the day. the dow opens at 12,479, after gaining 42 points on friday. the s&p rose 7 points. the nasdaq climbed 27. taking a look at overseas trading this morning, in tokyo, the nikkei added 38 points. but in hong kong, the hang seng dropped 70. this week, along with the future of america's economy, traders on wall street will
to the taliban. the report which focuses on a more than $2 billion transportation contract says there have been cases of money laundering and kickbacks given to afghan officials and police. >>> secretary of state hillary clinton says a senior north korean official will visit the u.s. this week to discuss the possible resumption of long-stalled talks on ending pyongyang's nuclear program. >>> sources say congressman david woo will not run for re-election but won't resign despite allegations the oregon democrat had an unwanted sexual encounter with a teenage girl. house democratic leader nancy pelosi is seek an ethics investigation into the accusations. >>> and astronomers have found the largest and farthest reservoir of water ever detected. the water is equivalent to 140 trillion times all the water in the earth's oceans. it voursurrounds a huge black h more than ten billion light years away. >>> now here's an early look at one of your top health headlines on msnbc.com. a new study suggests many uninformed voters cast their ballots based on candidates looks, especially frequent tv watchers. anal
by taliban and other militants in the southern eastern parts of the country to focus more on high profile attacks. we saw this yesterday with the killing, the gunning down of a top karzai adviser, and also last week with the killing of the afghan president's half brother. all of this comes at a time of great transition, and it also sends a message of who really is safe here in afghanistan. randi? >> thank you very much. appreciate that. >>> time, 46 minutes past the hour. a cnn in depth story, the phone hacking scandal in papers owned by murdoch. and then the country's top police official, paul stevenson, resigned over the weekend. that's him right there. the assistant commissioner followed suit today. >>> in italy, a judge today dismissed all defense motions in the trial of prime minister berlusconi. he is accused of having sex with a minor, and is charged with abuse of power. he denies the charges and the next hearing date is in october. >>> the kick that brought all of joy to japan. the amazing victory in the united states in the finals of the women's word cup, and saying they were pla
and discussed security with hamid karzai. the taliban has continued attacks during the transition phase as control passes from nato troops to afghan forces. >> the hacker group anonymous has targeted the colombian president and one of british murdoch's papers. they say they have broken into servers belonging to nato and have got their hands on restricted material. they said that they were sitting on a gigabyte of data stolen from the military alliance. on wednesday, authorities in the u.s. and europe arrested 21 alleged members of the anonymous. nato has called the group a threat to governments and the people. for anyone out there who has criticized their employer, there is some good news. the european court of justice has ruled in favor of a nurse who complain about the care of a nursing home she worked at and was fired up -- was fired forward. >> she lost her job as a jury after connors after bringing a criminal complaint against her employers. -- she lost her job as a nurse for the elderly. the european court of human rights has ruled the dismissal on fair and infringe upon the right
suggests they are suspected of fighting for the taliban. news of the rest comes on the day when nato troops are due to hand over control to afghan security forces. the u.k. inquiry into phone hacking by journalists could be widening beyond news international. detectives have asked for records of a 2003 inquiry which looked into the use of private investigators by reporters. it found journalists across the industry have paid for illegally obtained information. a new study suggests taller people are at greater risk of developing a range of cancers. the research in the lancet found in women the likelihood of developing cancer rose by 16% for every 10 centimeters increase in height. taller men were all so mad at increased risk. -- were also at increased risk. the space shuttle atlantis is ending the american shuttle program, now landing. those are live pictures. more on that to come. irish prime minister accused the vatican of putting the church's reputation ahead of child rape victims. this follows a clerical sex abuse inquiry. >> the church and the state in ireland have been linked for genera
that happened. >>> time now 5:46 the taliban is denying reports that the group's leader is dead. a spokesman says someone hacked into his phone and sent out a fake message to journalists saying the leader has died. he has lead the decade long insurgency. he ruled most of afghanistan as leader of his taliban government. >>> san francisco supervisors also voted to monitor the cell phone radiation laws. they are now required to educate users about potential health risks but the new ordnance does not require the disclosure of riddance levels like a previous law passed last year. >>> only on 2. the lost altos wind surfer. the 62-year-old residence from lost altos said when she got stranded and the wind died down. her radio and beacon did not work. to stay alive she had to cling to her wind surfing board and tread for hours. she was not scared until the tide pulled her toward the pilings of the san mateo bridge. >> i think i was most scared going through the the bridge. i was afraid i might get caught on something. it was getting cold. that's why i had to keep swimming the whole time. >> ktvu morn
takes tougher action against the taliban as well as al qaeda. meanwhile, defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan as i was mentioning. panetta is meeting with american military leaders as well as afghan officials. atia abawi is in kabul, afghanistan. he's making strong remarks when it comes to al qaeda and how he wants to continue stamping them out. >> reporter: good morning, thomas. that's absolutely right. on his flight from d.c. to kabul he did speak to reporter on the plane that he was on about al qaeda and said that the strategic defeat of al qaeda was within reach, pointing to the death of osama bin laden, pointing to the information that we were able to retrieve from his compound, including the names of key leaders that they'd like to go after. and he says that this is the time to go after al qaeda. let's listen to what he had to say. >> now is the moment following what happened with bin laden to put maximum pressure on them. because i do believe that if we continue this effort, that we can really cripple al qaeda. >> reporter: al qaeda aside, this is afghanistan. he's on
by the taliban. this reflects assistmatic policy of the taliban and their isi handlers, the intelligence organization is i think behind this as well. and also al-qaeda. this policy is a tool to eliminate real and potential enemies of the islamists they want to reimplant back in cob he will. >> so this is a blow to the u.s. in afghanistan? >> yes, and also the destabilization. it's another example of pakistan interference in this area. the senior of military commander, a marine general, told the minnesota media last week that the pakistanis have still not severed the taliban supply lines coming in from pakistan. >> so many were aware of them and what they were up to when bin laden in was captured and they think wow, did they know about this, were they shielding them. now they are cutting off $800 million s that the right move? >> yes, it is certainly the right move. we should have done is before, ten years late. we should have conditioned the aid and especially the military aid long ago. we should also take other steps. >> like what? >> in 1993 secretary of state baker sent aler to the pa
fighters, using the secluded also fine villages for training and planning. many taliban, several of them arabs linked to al qaeda, damaging their network. yet the clashes reveal al qaeda said mostly to be across the border in pakistan is again a concern, back where they started in afghanistan's hills. we push down into the valley, still an insurgent strong hold. high tech american attack helicopters buzzed overyaed until militants shot from them from the valley. >> it's uncharacteristic from the taliban. they're getting pretty gutsy. if you push up any farther past that, you're going to take enemy contact, that's pretty certain. >> the afghans clear about who lay in wait ahead of them. >>. >> translator: it's very draws, taliban, arabs, pakistanis there. >> at the foot of valley, the american base is often hit by pot shots, sometimes from lone gunmen up high who they then mortar. >> al qaeda's return to these remote hills could tie america's hands, making it harder to justify pulling back from here. the terrorist network that made america's case for invading slipping back in, just when a
it is threatened, because of course the taliban allowed al-qaida on afghan soil when it ran the country, and we believe that there is a high likelihood that that would happen again. >> reporter: also, he pointed out that there will be ahift in the focus of the battle here in the coming months, moving from the south up to the east. they are sending in more special forces to the east where we're seeing taliban militants come over from pakistan. they are going to send in more helicopters and they are going to send some more heavy equipment. he was trying to say this wasn't a change in strategy, more a realignment of troops. the taliban was kicked out of the east and they are trying to get back. he said from this point on that will be the focus. when he joins the cia he will have to deal with the problem that is pakistan itself. relations are at an all time low between the two countries. he didn't appear to have a clear strategy of how he is going to do that. that will be his number one job and task when he gets back to washington. >> reporter: from one come phra indicate job he goes to another. th
or be in support roles. >>> yesterday's handover took place in helmand province. it's a taliban stronghold where more foreign troops have died than in any other province. cbs news correspondent mandy clark was there for the changing of the guard. >> reporter: helmand province has been the deadliest battleground in afghanistan. nearly half of all coalition deaths have happened here. president obama's surge focussed on turning that around. the proichbs's capital saw troop movement of a different kind with the official handover to afghan forces. one sign of how fragile this security situation is, the ceremony was not announced in advance. out of fear the taliban would strike. the new commander of coalition forces in afghanistan acknowledged the heavy price american and british troops paid for the progress made here. >> there are some voices that are raised to question whether this sacrifice has been worth it. those of white house wear this uniform have one answer. yes! >> reporter: it was certainly a proud moment for the afghans, as the defense minister inspected his troops. the handover of power f
at this hour. the taliban is denying reports this morning that their leader mullah omar is dead. a spokesman for the terror group says outsiders tapped into taliban phones and into their web site. those outside agents sent a fake text message that omar was dead. the taliban also claiming a post on their web site saying the same thing was also a fake. >> british prime minister david cameron will address parliament this morning over the news of the world scandal. this comes one day after news corp ceo rupert murdoch and his son james testified before a committee saying they were appalled by the scandal. >> i would just like to say one sentence, this is the most humble day of my life. >> as for the man who attacked murdoch with a pie made of foam, well, he's under arrest this morning. he calls himself a comedian, by the way, news corp is the parent company of fox news. nearly two years after he was charged with murdering 13 people including a pregnant woman, the ft. hood shooter is finally be arraigned in a military court. he is still collecting a paycheck from the military will face a judge
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